The Role of the Non -ICU Staff Nurse on a Medical Emergency Team – Care Example

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"The Role of the Non -ICU Staff Nurse on a Medical Emergency Team" is a wonderful example of a paper on care. Quantitative methodologies are methods, research types, or procedures used in a quantitative type of research. Quantitative research is defined as a formal, systematic, and objective process used to describe variables, examine relationships among variables, and determines cause and effect relationships between variables (Burns & Grove, 2005, p. 23). Nursing researchers prefer the use of qualitative research because of a substantial knowledge guiding nursing practice. A quantitative methodology is also a form of research design that examines the numerical features or frequency of a variable, an example is a percentage of medical-emergency teams (METs) who understand their roles or the number of staff nurses who feel comfortable in initiating MET-calls (Holland & Rees, 2010, p.

108). Since 1930, a lot of researchers prefer only quantitative methods as the most scientific approach in conducting research. The philosophical origin of quantitative methodologies is derived from logical positivism or empiricism, which conveys a scientific inquiry base on logic, truth, laws, axioms, and predictions (Burns & Grove, 2005, p.

23). The research article on the role of the non -ICU staff nurse on a medical emergency team including their perceptions and understandings employed the quantitative methodologies and laid out the contributions of METs in decreasing in-hospital cardiac arrests, unplanned ICU admissions, and overall hospital mortality rates as well as the numerical and variable relationships between the nursing staff's familiarity and perceptions about METs. Analysis of Quantitative Methodology To analyze the quantitative methodology of nursing practice, an example of research utilizing quantitative methodologies is taken into analysis. Pusateri, Prior, & Kiely (2011) conducted research on the role of the non-ICU staff nurse on a medical emergency team as well as their perceptions and understanding (p. 22). There are several ways to conduct a quantitative methodology.

Quantitative research methods include descriptive, exploratory, survey, historical review, cross-section, longitudinal, retrospective, prospective, correlational, quasi-experimental, and experimental (Ricks, 2004, p. 117). The research sample utilized the survey method as researchers developed a 30-item survey form consisting of 13 demographic and background items and 17 items based on a 5-point Likert agreement scale intended for the 388 nurses at Allegheny General Hospital in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. In the research example, a quantitative methodology is preferred over the qualitative methodology because of the approach a quantitative methodology has.

Since the researchers utilized the survey method, the results of the survey will be gathered numerically by the use of statistical measurement. The quantitative approach will also explain the role of non-ICU staff nurses on METs and predict the relationship between METs, nurse retention and recruitment, and patient care outcomes. Because of quantitative research, the numerical data gathered can be used to generalize the finding and deduct conclusions from the survey’ s results (Watson, 2008, p.

17). Quantitative methodology is more objective and is always use in evidence-based practice in nursing. It resulted in the identification of the medical emergency team as a very important and helpful member of the medical departments, surgical departments, emergency room, and ICU during the time when a patient suffered from abnormal vital signs and neurologic conditions. The quantitative methodology also identified that the presence of non-ICU staff nurses has been shown to contribute to a decrease in in-hospital cardiac arrests, unplanned ICU admissions, and overall hospital mortality rates. Reliability of the Selected Research Article The 30-item survey checklist used in the study to collect data from 388 nurses at Allegheny General Hospital in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania had been developed after examining survey formats used in previous studies of nurses' perceptions of and attitudes toward METs.

Based on a scholarly basis, the tool has both validity and reliability. To increase the accuracy of gathered data, a survey was administered after two years and five months of implementing METs in Allegheny General Hospital. Extensive information dissemination was given to staff hired before the implementation of the MET, staff hired after implementation of the MET, and non-ICU staff nurses.

The result of the research was verified by a second investigator. Implications for Practice of Quantitative Methodology Holland& Rees (2010) identified the implications of quantitative methodology to evidence-based practice: (1) identify the need for changes in current interventions and practice in nursing to improve patient outcome, and (2) identify the most effective intervention in care among existing options. In general, quantitative methodology states the problem in nursing practice specifically and in set terms.

The relationships between variables were clearly and precisely identified and conclusions can be more objective. Because of controlled observations, high levels of reliability are achieved in laboratory experiments, mass surveys, or another form of research manipulations, and future researches related to practice can be observed and modified scientifically. Conclusion Quantitative methodologies are applied in the research about the role, perceptions, and understanding of the non -ICU staff nurse on a medical emergency team. Nursing researchers prefer the use of qualitative research because it is formal, systematic, and objective. Quantitative methodologies are the most scientific approach in conducting research and use numerical features or frequency of a variable.

It also conveys scientific inquiry based on facts. The research article on the role of the non -ICU staff nurse on a medical emergency team including their perceptions and understandings is taken as an example of research utilizing quantitative methodology. All aspects of the research article that would feature the characteristics of quantitative methodology were compared and analyzed. The analysis also includes the types of quantitative methodology and the description of the instruments used by the researcher.

Comparisons were also taken into account regarding the advantages of quantitative methodology over the qualitative methodology. The research article utilized the survey method and found it to be valid and reliable as it was base on previous studies of nurses' perceptions of and attitudes toward METs. Researches that applied the quantitative methods is useful in evidence-based nursing practice in the sense that it modifies the existing interventions and chooses the best alternatives based on scientific inquiry. The research article on the role, perceptions, and understanding of the non -ICU staff nurse on a medical emergency team and quantitative methodology have helped to expand the scientific body of knowledge and have uplifted the quality of life of mankind.

References

Burns, N. &Grove, S.K. (2005). The Evolution of Research in Nursing. The Practice of Nursing Research: Conduct, Critic, and Utilization (5th ed.) (p. 16-28) Missouri: Elsevier Saunders.

Daniels, R. (2004). Evidence-Based Practice and Nursing Research. Nursing Fundamentals: Caring & Clinical Decision Making (p. 114-124) New York: Delmar Learning.

Holland, K. &Rees, C. (2010). Research Evidence. Nursing: Evidence-Based Practice Skills (p. 106-142) New York: Oxford University Press.

Pusateri, Margaret E., Prior, Michele M. & Kiely, Sharon C. (2011). The Role of the Non-ICU Staff Nurse on a Medical Emergency Team: Perceptions and Understanding. American Journal of Nursing, 111 (5), 22-29. DOI: 10.1097/01.NAJ.0000398045.00299.64

Watson, R. (2008). Approaches to Research. Nursing Research: Designs and Methods (p. 13-22) United Kingdom: Churchill Livingstone Elsevier.

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