The Process of Childbearing – Pregnancy Example

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"The Process of Childbearing"  is an outstanding example of a paper on pregnancy. Childbearing is a significant process in the life of a woman. However, lack of awareness about the challenges that women go through is clear. The situation is attributed due to the failure of the media and the public to address the issue. Consequently, the two films will provide an interesting and insightful analysis of how healthcare institutions seek to maximize their incomes at the expense of pregnant women. It is also necessary to highlight the depression that these women often suffer after the childbearing process. Lake, R.

& Epstein, A. (January 9, 2008). The business of Being Born. The United States of America:   Red Envelope Entertainment. Q. 1                       The film surprised me as a mother who has given birth twice. Firstly, I have always believed that healthcare workers are always concerned with helping pregnant mothers to go through the experience in a manner that promotes their health and happiness. In contrast, the film depicted them as workers who are only interested in maximizing their employer’ s revenue. Second, I have always believed that giving birth in a hospital environment is the best thing for the mother and the baby.

Instead, the movie showed that in some instances giving birth at a home might be in the best interests of both parties. Q. 2 The film presented many perspectives that aroused different reactions from the audience. Firstly, I liked the fact that the movie focused on an important event that has been ignored by the media. Secondly, I also liked that the producers highlighted the options that are available for giving birth. Most people believe that the best place to give birth in a hospital.

In contrast, the producers have shown that pregnant women should exercise more choice when deciding where to give birth. I disliked the manner in which uncaring medical workers treated pregnant women. I do not agree with the notion advanced by the producers that giving birth in a hospital should be replaced by giving birth at home. The hospitals presented in the film do not represent what is happening in all hospitals in the country.   Q. 3 The film has raised many questions in my mind.

First, it has prompted an evaluation of the notion that pregnant women in the country receive better care as compared to women in other parts of the world. Second, it has questioned the belief that healthcare institutions are mission-driven organizations that aim at improving the lives of people in society as opposed to being profit run institutions. Thirdly, the film has created doubts about whether giving birth in the hospital serves the interests of the mother and her child. Q. 4 The most memorable scene in the film involves Julia Barnett being handed a baby by a nurse as a midwife looks on.

The smile of relief and love is one of the most memorable events in the film.   As a mother, I could relate to the joy of receiving a child for the first time. The experience produces one of the most outstanding human emotions. Q. 5 The film addressed the practice where patients are required to give birth through Caesarian section. The process has been discussed in our clinical setting due to concerns about the fact that some hospital workers may force patients to choose that option in order to maximize hospital fees.

Although the practice is clearly important for a pregnant woman who is having difficulties with natural birth, it undermines her physical health. Consequently, there is an urgent need for further research on the topic. Q. 6 I would advise my friend to go and see the movie. Although it presents the birthing experience in a horrifying manner, it provides valuable insights into the experience that will enable a pregnant mother to make informed decisions about the process. In addition, it educates women about the options that are available to them for giving birth.

Furthermore, it will empower them to protest against any possible mistreatment by the healthcare workers. Miller, L. J., Ashley, J., Zersen, H., Wingert, B., Mayer, J. L., & Barton, B. (2005). Descent into desperation. Oak Brook, IL: Digital Realm. Q. 1 The film surprised me in many ways. As a mother, I believe that the process of giving birth is one of the most joyful things that a woman can experience during her lifetime. As a result, I was surprised to see that there are women that undergo a period of depression after giving birth.

In addition, I was amazed by the lack of social support that some of them had to experience. Q. 2 I liked the fact that the producers were willing to confront an aspect of the birthing process that is rarely addressed. Although I did not experience the same, I could identify with the women in the film. In addition, the things that drove them to depression are factors that can affect any woman. As a result, I agree with the producers that society needs to focus on helping women to go back to their normal lives after giving birth.

In addition, pregnant women should be prepared for the possible psychological trauma and challenges that they will go through. Moreover, they should find support groups to help them during this transformational period in their lives. Q. 3 The film has raised many questions in my mind about giving birth and the role that society plays in the process. First, society needs to figure out how to treat pregnant women before and after they give birth.

In addition, there is a possibility that family members and spouses do not understand what they can do to make the experience more manageable for the mother. Similarly, viewers have been left to wonder whether the depression that these women go through is a representation of long-term problems. Lastly, the film made me question the essence of giving birth if causes so much pain and suffering to the mother. Q. 4 The most memorable part of the film was the start. I was astonished by the statistics that were given about the prevalence levels for depression among women who have just given birth.

Although the subsequent interviews were touching, the statistics created a more significant impression. The public should be alarmed that such a high number of women undergo depression after giving birth. Consequently, stakeholders in the healthcare industry and public health policy wonks should address the issue. Personally, it made me decide to take a proactive role in my friend’ s pregnancy. Q. 5 The film raised an issue that we had not discussed in our clinical site. The depression that some pregnant women go through before and after giving birth is rarely discussed.

Consequently, there is a lack of awareness about the issue. In addition, most women fail to report the issue. Instead, they choose to go through the experience alone. The decision not only denies them the opportunity of getting the help that they need but also exposes them to potential suicide attempts. Consequently, the film has played a significant role in driving the conversation about the issue. Stakeholders have to take note of the issue so that they can develop appropriate intervention measures for preventing their occurrences and effective responses when they happen. Q. 6 I would recommend the movie to a close friend.

It addresses an aspect of the birthing process that elicits sad emotions. However, it is a powerful reminder of the challenges that pregnant women go through. In addition, it will enable the woman to establish if she is at risk of facing a depression so that she can take measures. However, the sad nature of the film requires a pregnant woman to watch it with a friend. Consequently, I will volunteer to watch it with her. Conclusion The two films have explored significant parts of the childbearing process.

The first film demonstrated how a profit maximization agenda undermines the quality of care provided to expectant women. In contrast, the second film has focused on the depression that women suffer once they have given birth. The two films have contributed to a better understanding of the childbearing process.

References

Lake, R. & Epstein, A. (January 9, 2008). Business of Being Born. The United States of

America: Red Envelope Entertainment.

Miller, L. J., Ashley, J., Zersen, H., Wingert, B., Mayer, J. L., & Barton, B. (2005). Descent

into desperation. Oak Brook, IL: Digital Realm.

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